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British jewellery designer reveals the trauma of being stalked for four years inspired her to...

British jewellery designer reveals the trauma of being stalked for four years inspired her to create £300 ‘knuckleduster’ rings – and Adele, Fearne Cotton and Rihanna are fans

Jean London, founded by Hannah Mossman Moore sells ‘big rocks for powerful people’ – and has earned a slew of celebrity fans including Rihanna and Adele
The ‘knuckleduster’ rings retail from £300 and use big stones in big settings – reinventing the traditional cocktail ring 
Mossman Moore, 29, says she was inspired to create bolder rings after feeling threatened by a wealthy man who stalked and harrassed her for four years 
Told The Sunday Times: ‘I actually started sleeping with them on because I felt more powerful wearing these huge rocks on my fingers.’ 

By Jo Tweedy For Mailonline
Published: 10:23 GMT, 13 February 2022 | Updated: 10:37 GMT, 13 February 2022

A British jewellery designer has revealed how the glamorous over-sized cocktail rings she creates were influenced by her own experience of being harassed for four years by a man she didn’t want to date.

Hannah Mossman Moore’s ‘knuckleduster’ rings, which start from around £300 and which she sells under the brand Jean London, have gained a celebrity following with the likes of Adele, Rihanna and Fearne Cotton all fans. 
However, the bold rings have a more serious undertone and the British jeweller, 29, told The Sunday Times, that they represent ‘jewellery as armour’ for women, saying her own trauma at being stalked changed the way she designs.
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Jean London, founded by Hannah Mossman Moore sells ‘big rocks for powerful people’ – and has earned a slew of celebrity fans including Rihanna and Adele

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Her reimagined versions of the traditional cocktail ring, which became prominent in society in the 1920s, feature a thicker band, chunky settings and large, colourful  semi-precious stones.
She told the Sunday newspaper that as a 25-year-old, she was harrassed and stalked by a wealthy man she met at an industry networking event for four years after she refused his advances.  
The Philosophy graduate said her current designs have replaced the more delicate rings with smaller stones she used to create, evolving into ‘big rocks for powerful people’ that have quickly become her trademark. 
She said: ‘My designs shifted to sort of big knuckledusters and powerful jewellery which you could kind of wear on you as armour. I actually started sleeping with them on because I felt more powerful wearing these huge rocks on my fingers.’ 

The semi-precious stones are all ethically sourced. A period living in Sri Lanka saw her influenced by a local mine owner, who ran female-run mines, where the workers would hold shares in the stones they mined. 

Reimagining the cocktail ring: The ‘knuckleduster’ rings retail from £300 and use large, ethically mined semi-precious stones in bold settings

Pictured: Fearne Cotton wearing Jean London designs; the brand was named after Mossman Moore’s late grandmother, Jean Mossman, who was a journalist

In a note on the Jean London website, she says she wanted to kick back against an industry that is far too often unethical and dominated by men, saying: ‘I came to understand the best – and the worst – aspects of the business. 

‘It’s a very male-dominated industry and many companies really don’t care about where their gemstones come from or how their jewellery is made.’ 
The Jean London website reveals that Mossman Moore named the jewellery after her late grandmother, Jean Mossman, a journalist, who the jeweller calls a ‘determined unconventionalist’ whose spirit ‘informs every aspect of the brand’. 
The knuckleduster, also known as ‘brass knuckles’, harks back to Ancient Rome, when gladiators would wear a gloved version of them – the ‘caestus’ – to gain advantage over their opponents while in battle.  

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